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    • The future? BorgWarner debuts their eBooster electrically driven compressor

      Get used to seeing this. Electric compressors that will force air into the motor have some advantages namely over turbochargers. Boost in theory will be instant as you do not have to wait as you do with a turbocharger for exhaust gases to spool the wheels.


      The downside of course is complexity, capability, and cost. What does something like this eBooster flow? We do not know. BorgWarner conveniently omitted specifications only saying that three major manufacturers will be using the eBooster which is expected to provide efficiency gains of 10%.

      That means this is going to primarily be a fuel efficiency technology and not a performance technology. It would be interesting to see a couple electric compressors used to offset lag from a big turbo setup.

      An electric compressor does not bring with it the weight and associated batteries of an electric motor. It still feeds an internal combustion engine making it a somewhat natural pairing if the amount of electricity needed is not exorbitant.

      Mercedes discussed introducing 'electric turbochargers' a couple years ago and it seems now they are finally reaching a production example.


      BorgWarner’s eBooster® Electrically Driven Compressor Celebrates Premiere

      - Nearly instant boost and torque for a fun-to-drive-experience
      - Enables small-engine fuel economy with big-engine boost
      - Improves performance for combustion and hybrid vehicles

      Auburn Hills, Michigan, April 28, 2017 – BorgWarner, a global leader in clean and efficient technology solutions for combustion, hybrid and electric vehicles, debuts its 48-volt eBooster® electrically driven compressor in Daimler’s latest 3.0-liter gasoline engine. The engine will feature the eBooster technology matched with a BorgWarner-supplied turbocharger to improve fuel efficiency, enhance low-end torque and deliver boost on demand without any perceptible turbo lag.

      “Our market-leading eBooster technology enables 6-cylinder engines to deliver the same performance and even more fun-to-drive experience as a much larger conventional V8,” said Frédéric Lissalde, President and General Manager, BorgWarner Turbo Systems. “By enabling engine downsizing, eBooster technology improves fuel efficiency by 5 to 10 percent in combustion and hybrid vehicles.”

      BorgWarner’s eBooster electrically driven compressor delivers boost on demand until the turbocharger takes over, improving boost at low engine speeds and nearly eliminating turbo lag. Featuring a brushless DC motor, durable samarium-cobalt magnets and highly efficient power electronics, the compact eBooster technology offers automakers flexible packaging options and can be adapted to a wide range of hybrid or combustion applications.

      Mass production of BorgWarner’s eBooster solution is currently ramping up with the innovative system launching first with three global automakers, including Daimler.

      This article was originally published in forum thread: The future? BorgWarner debuts their eBooster electrically driven compressor started by Sticky View original post
      Comments 12 Comments
      1. Torgus's Avatar
        Torgus -
        I wonder how much it draws...and at what voltage.
      1. Optigrab's Avatar
        Optigrab -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Torgus Click here to enlarge
        I wonder how much it draws...and at what voltage.


        eBooster available as a 12-volt and a48-volt version
        12volt...the eBooster electrically driven compressor is operated at 2 kW and a minimum maintained speed of 6,000 rpm with an average power consumption of 210 W.

        BorgWarner is supplying its 48-volt eBooster electrically driven compressor for Daimler's new three-litre petrol engine.
        http://www.just-auto.com/news/borgwa..._id176299.aspx

      1. BlackJetE90OC's Avatar
        BlackJetE90OC -
        Mercedes seems to think it is the future. They are using one on their new 408hp inline 6-cylinder(M256).

        Looks to be a fuel efficiency technology, as well as a performance technology. Mercedes is claiming M256 will have no turbo lag whatsoever.
      1. inlineS54B32's Avatar
        inlineS54B32 -
        This is pretty cool and am curious how well it works. I like the idea of having "supercharger-like" (near instant response to throttle tip-in) low-end power coupled with the good mid to high-end torque we get from a turbocharger. I wonder how fast the thing will respond though, considering they still phrase it as "near-instant response".

        Either way - I am always for improving performance with technology, and since it looks like NA performance oriented engines are going out with the tide - am hoping this helps close the NA/FI performance gap.
      1. subaru335i's Avatar
        subaru335i -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Torgus Click here to enlarge
        I wonder how much it draws...and at what voltage.
        In this PDF they go into a lot more detail, its really interesting: www.turbos.bwauto.com/tools/download.aspx?t=document&r=842&d=1052

        It says power output at 12V is 1.7 kW nominal and peak of 2.4 kW (200A). At 48V power output is 5 kW nominal and 6.2 kW peak (130A).
        48V has better max power and response time. The response time of the compressor wheel from 6000rpm idle to full speed of 70,000 rpm was 230 ms and 250 ms from a full stop.

        It has a pressure ratio of 1.45, a max continuous time of 14s of boost, and flow of approx 11lb/min which equates to about 110 whp extra if you use the rule of thumb.

        That is pretty $#@!in cool! Its really only used at low rpm while the real turbo is spooling and allows them to use a bigger turbo/bigger turbine (with less backpressure) than they normally would because this fills in where a big turbo would have lag normally.
        The video shows this ebooster is downstream of the normal turbo compressor and valves open and close to bypass it during low load cruising and high load after the normal turbo is spooled.

        They also mentioned the boost at low rpm lets them use more EGR than normal which is where some of the fuel savings comes from and the bigger turbine they can use on the turbo means less backpressure at high rpm and less detonation and lower egts.

        Overall it seems real cool but I still can't wait for OEMs to start using F1 style separated turbos where the electric motor is in the middle of the compressor/turbine to end up generating power back when boost isn't needed and getting the torque fill like this provides at low rpm.



      1. BlackJetE90OC's Avatar
        BlackJetE90OC -
        I could see BMW going this route with the next gen M3/M4.
      1. Alpina_B3_Lux's Avatar
        Alpina_B3_Lux -
        Audi already uses this technology in their SQ7 TDI, I believe (albeit for a diesel engine). Its technology is based on their S5 TDI prototype if I am not mistaken, and which already had the 48V grid I think.
      1. CobraMarty's Avatar
        CobraMarty -
        I'll take one.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Wouldn't be long until tuners were trying to send more juice to it and overspin it.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by subaru335i Click here to enlarge
        In this PDF they go into a lot more detail, its really interesting: www.turbos.bwauto.com/tools/download.aspx?t=document&r=842&d=1052

        It says power output at 12V is 1.7 kW nominal and peak of 2.4 kW (200A). At 48V power output is 5 kW nominal and 6.2 kW peak (130A).
        48V has better max power and response time. The response time of the compressor wheel from 6000rpm idle to full speed of 70,000 rpm was 230 ms and 250 ms from a full stop.

        It has a pressure ratio of 1.45, a max continuous time of 14s of boost, and flow of approx 11lb/min which equates to about 110 whp extra if you use the rule of thumb.

        That is pretty $#@!in cool! Its really only used at low rpm while the real turbo is spooling and allows them to use a bigger turbo/bigger turbine (with less backpressure) than they normally would because this fills in where a big turbo would have lag normally.
        The video shows this ebooster is downstream of the normal turbo compressor and valves open and close to bypass it during low load cruising and high load after the normal turbo is spooled.

        They also mentioned the boost at low rpm lets them use more EGR than normal which is where some of the fuel savings comes from and the bigger turbine they can use on the turbo means less backpressure at high rpm and less detonation and lower egts.

        Overall it seems real cool but I still can't wait for OEMs to start using F1 style separated turbos where the electric motor is in the middle of the compressor/turbine to end up generating power back when boost isn't needed and getting the torque fill like this provides at low rpm.



        That's a good post.

        I look forward to this as I'm all for mitigating lag.
      1. subaru335i's Avatar
        subaru335i -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Wouldn't be long until tuners were trying to send more juice to it and overspin it.
        You will be able to overspin a little bit but unfortunately you won't be able to double the output like you can on a normal turbo. At peak power we are already talking about 200A of current! Which is a ton and you need 3 really thick (expensive) copper cables to carry that. I wouldn't expect they have a huge safety factor in the cables.

        Also the electric motor can only put out its peak power for so long before the windings overheat, not to mention the inverter to drive the synchronous permanent magnet DC motor can only make it spin so fast because of the back EMF at high rpm and the switching frequency of the PWM in the inverter.
        Im an engineer my company makes PMDC motors and inverters just like these and most of the time you absolutely cannot exceed the rated output without burning things up.
        You might be able to put a bigger compressor wheel on the motor as long as you don't increase inertia too much but then you are adding more lag on something that is used only to reduce lag/increase transient response. I would still say with a system like this you would be best just upgrading the normal turbo and leaving this alone for torque fill.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by subaru335i Click here to enlarge
        You will be able to overspin a little bit but unfortunately you won't be able to double the output like you can on a normal turbo. At peak power we are already talking about 200A of current! Which is a ton and you need 3 really thick (expensive) copper cables to carry that. I wouldn't expect they have a huge safety factor in the cables.

        Also the electric motor can only put out its peak power for so long before the windings overheat, not to mention the inverter to drive the synchronous permanent magnet DC motor can only make it spin so fast because of the back EMF at high rpm and the switching frequency of the PWM in the inverter.
        Im an engineer my company makes PMDC motors and inverters just like these and most of the time you absolutely cannot exceed the rated output without burning things up.
        You might be able to put a bigger compressor wheel on the motor as long as you don't increase inertia too much but then you are adding more lag on something that is used only to reduce lag/increase transient response. I would still say with a system like this you would be best just upgrading the normal turbo and leaving this alone for torque fill.
        Sure but the point is ultimately tuners will have something else to tinker with.